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Tip of the Week
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When you don't know what to do in a particular situation at work, or if you are looking for inspiration to help solve your problems, come check out the Tips of the Week. These are jewels from LRH that are proven solutions!

 

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Top tags: Executive Skill  Administration  Investments  Management Skill  Policy  Structure  Time Management 

What am I trying to do?

Posted By Scott Waldroff, Thursday, August 23, 2018

What am I trying to do?

 

Here is something extremely powerful you can apply right now.

You'll like it.

It will take you about 5 minutes to do – unless you get carried away with it.

Which might happen, but then, that's your doing, not mine.

 

It's an excerpt out of a lecture Mr. Hubbard gave in 1952.

Here it is:

"Be true to your own goals.

"To cause things, one must be cause.

"And the primary requisite of cause is a statement of intention and goal.

"Primary requisite to be cause is a clear statement of what you are trying to do.

"Only when you clearly state it can you avoid being yourself an eventual effect.

"'What am I trying to do?' If you can't answer that you'll foul up!

"So even though it's a poor goal, it is better than none.

"You can put that down as a beautiful maxim. Sounds like one of those horrible truisms, but boy, it will fish you out of more holes than you can possibly imagine you can get yourself into: A poor goal is better than none.

"You'll find yourself very often squirreling around and spinning around. You don't know which way you're going or which way is up because you decided all the goals you could put your eyes on were too vague or too poor or too unwanted to try to attain.

"And that itself is a bad aberration and shows a misdirection on your part and a mis-estimation on your own part, and a lack of understanding on your own part of what you are doing.

"There is no goal vast enough to absorb your total capabilities because your total capabilities are so vast that they make goals.

"You are yourself cause.

"So how on earth can you set it up so cause can be anything else but cause?

"Unless you come down scale a little.

"But a goal, any kind of goal, is better than none."

L. Ron Hubbard
From: The Code of Behavior
A lecture given on 18 February 1952
(emphasis added)

Here's how you might apply this:

1) Read the above and make sure you clear up any words so you're fully tracking.

2) Grab a piece of paper (or open up a new document).

3) Across the top, write in big bold letters: "What am I trying to do?"

4) Then underneath, write out in as few or as many words as you want, "a clear statement of what you are trying to do".

5) Don't get hung up on format. Just write. Just answer up on the question "What am I trying to do?"

6) Splurge on it.

And remember:

"There is no goal vast enough to absorb your total capabilities because your total capabilities are so vast that they make goals."

7) Just keep writing until you're happy with what you've written. That's it. There's nothing more to it. You'll know when you're done. It can apply to today. It can apply to this week. It can apply to a project or program you're doing. It can even apply to a lot longer span than right now.

It applies on a personal basis – it applies on your post/position, and it also applies on a company basis. Try it each way.

It will give you some focus.

8) If you want to, write me back and let me know how it went: president@wise.org

Did it help add a little focus to your day/week/project/life?

Let your capabilities make goals!

Best,

Scott Waldroff

CEO WISE Int

Tags:  Executive Skill  Management Skill  Time Management 

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Your Best Investment in the World

Posted By Scott Waldroff, Thursday, August 23, 2018

Your Best Investment in the World

Ever wonder what your best possible investment could be?

Stocks? Bonds? Real Estate? Gold? Mutual funds? Retirement Accounts?

Here’s a tip - it’s from a lecture given by L. Ron Hubbard in February of 1956: 

“The best way to penalize yourself is to start believing everything is scarce and that you’d better save it.

"Every once in a while, I hear some father say to his son, 'Well, I worked and slaved and so forth and finally sent you through to school, bought you nice clothes and set you on your way. And here I am, old and gray.'

"You know, the only answer to that is, 'Why the hell didn't you make more money?'

“I'm afraid that's not very son-like. But really, it's the truth! Papa was making a game out of not creating, in some fashion.

"Now, if you think the money is the end of the effort, you're making a bad mistake there too, because it actually is merely a representation of your creativeness, that's all it is. It merely represents it in some fashion. And if your creativeness is good, you don't have to worry about saving any money.

“Your best investment is your own skill and your ability to put things back together again, your ability to stand on two feet and live - that's your best investment in the world."

Just in case you were wondering.

Your best investment would therefore be in whatever improves:

· ‘your own skill’

· ‘your ability to put things back together again’

· ‘your ability to stand on two feet and live’

What do you do to improve your own skill?

What do you do to improve your ability to put things back together again?

What do you do to improve your ability to stand on two feet and live?

Happy investing!

Scott Waldroff

CEO WISE Int

Tags:  Executive Skill  Investments 

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The Structure of Organization, What is Policy?

Posted By Administration, Friday, May 6, 2016

“All that is needed to expand an org or its business, given a good basic purpose and an area to expand into, is the knowledge of the expansion formula:


“DIRECT A CHANNEL TOWARD ATTAINMENT,
PUT SOMETHING ON IT, REMOVE DISTRACTIONS, BARRIERS, NONCOMPLIANCE AND OPPOSITION.”

L. Ron Hubbard

THE STRUCTURE OF ORGANIZATION, WHAT IS POLICY?

Tags:  Administration  Policy  Structure 

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Efficiency and Flaps

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, February 10, 2016

When a new group member doesn't get trained up, they are so inefficient it takes two more group members to handle his generated flaps.So where's the demand people get trained and hatted before full posting?

"It's the small neglected bits that cause the disasters."

An efficient group doesn't tolerate them.

"Life gets easy only when the small bits are handled."

L. Ron Hubbard

Article of 8 September 1972,

Efficiency and Flaps

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Working and Managing

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, February 10, 2016

By actual experience in working and managing in many activities, I can state flatly that the most dangerous worker-manager thing to do is to work or manage from something else than statistics.


L. Ron Hubbard

WORKING AND MANAGING

7 JULY 1970

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Groups and Organisms

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Any group or organism or individual is somewhat interdependent upon its neighbors, on other groups and individuals. It cannot however put them right unless it itself has reached some acceptable level of approach to its ideal scenes.

"The conflict amongst organisms, individuals and groups does not necessarily add up to 'the survival of the fittest,' whatever that meant. It does however mean that in such conflict the best chance of survival goes to the individual, organism or group that best approaches and maintains its ideal scene, lesser ideal scenes, statistic and lesser statistics."

L. Ron Hubbard

WORKING AND MANAGING

7 July 1970

 

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